Disc Description

This disc is designed for the intermediate to advanced player and is made from our grippy flexible plastic. Softer in feel this disc is super durable and has a stable flight pattern. It is also an excellent maximum distance cold weather disc.

Flight Rating Descriptions

SPEED Speed is the ability of the disc to cut through the air. Speed Ratings are listed from 1 to 14. Discs with high numbers are faster. Faster discs go farther into the wind with less effort. Slower discs take more power
to throw, but have less of a chance
to fly past the basket.

GLIDE Glide describes the discs ability to maintain loft during flight. Discs with more glide are best for new players, and for producing maximum distance (especially downwind). Glide is rated from 1 to 7. Beginners looking for more distance should choose discs with more glide.

TURN High Speed Turn is the tendency of a disc to turn over or bank to the right (for righthand backhand throws) during the initial part of the flight. A disc with a +1 rating is most resistant to turning over, while a -5 rating will turn the most. Discs rated -2 to -5 make good roller discs.

FADE Low Speed Fade is the discs tendency to hook left (for righthand backhand throws) at the end of the flight. Fade is rated from 0 to 5. A disc rated 0 will finish straightest, while a disc rated 5 will hook hard at the end of the flight. Discs with a high fade rating are predicable even in wind.

Animal Info

Timber wolves or grey wolves, are the largest wild members of the dog family. They can weigh up to 120 lbs (55 kg) and stand up to three feet at the shoulder. They have silvery gray-brown backs, light tan underparts, and bushy tails. These carnivores eat different kinds of deer and other smaller animals and are usually top of the food chain in their area.

Wolves are very social animals, living in packs of 6 to 10 animals including a dominant “Alpha” male. At birth, wolf pups are deaf, blind, have dark fuzzy fur and weigh about one pound. Adult wolves territory can cover up to 193 square kilometers (120 square miles) and trespassing wolves risk being killed by that pack. They talk to each other with a combination of howles, barks and body language. Today, the majority of wolves live in remote regions of Northern Canada. In the past wolves had the largest range of any animal except humans.